FRC Game History

 2017: Steamworks

FIRST STEAMWORKS, the 2017 FIRST Robotics Competition game, invites two adventurers’ clubs, in an era where steam power reigns, to prepare their airships for a long distance race. Each three-team alliance prepares in three ways: 1. Build steam pressure. Robots collect fuel (balls) and score it in their boiler via high and low efficiency goals. Boilers turn fuel into steam pressure which is stored in the steam tank on their airship – but it takes more fuel in the low efficiency goal to build steam than the high efficiency goal. 2. Start rotors. Robots deliver gears to pilots on their airship for installation. Once the gear train is complete, they turn the crank to start the rotor. 3. Prepare for flight. Robots must latch on to their airship before launch (the end of the match) by ascending their ropes to signal that they’re ready for takeoff.

2016: Stronghold

For 2016, the robot game theme is Stronghold.  There are still two alliances, with (shocker) three teams per alliance. The game is played on a 27′ by 54′ field.  The game is divided up into two sections: a 15 second autonomous (auto) period where the robot controls itself, and a two minute and fifteen second teleoperated (teleop) period where human operators control the robot.  The field is divided up into two halves.  The robots can go onto both halves of the field.  The middle of the field are obstacles called Defenses.  There are nine different defenses.  The theme of the game is to breach the enemy’s defenses and then destroy the enemy stronghold.  Once the stronghold is destroyed you can either capture the stronghold or “storm it” / climb it to gain a ranking point.  A unique feature of the game is a concept called the spy-bot.  The spy bot is a robot that has the option of starting in the enemy’s “court”.

Read about our 2016 robot, QBot, here.

 

 

 

2015: Recycle Rush 

For 2015, the robot game theme is Recycle Rush. There are two alliances, with three teams per alliance. This game is played on a 27′ by 54′ field. The game is divided into two sections: a 15 second autonomous (auto) period where the robot controls itself, and a two minute and fifteen second teleoperated (teleop) period where human operators control the robot. Notably, the two alliances are separated from each other and are not allowed to interact much, unlike in previous games. The board itself reflects that with a large platform across the middle called the Step, which-each alliance is not allowed to cross. There are also two mini steps that go cross each alliance’s section, called the scoring platforms. The scoring platforms extend a little more than half the width of the field, and separate the each alliance’s side into three sections: the staging zone, the auto zone, and the landfill. In the staging zone, there are three recycle containers and three yellow boxes called ‘totes’. The auto zone is empty and landfill zone has some grey totes and four recycling containers on the Step.

During the auto period, each alliance member can move their robot to the auto zone for 4 points, move all three recycle bins to the auto zone for 6 points, move all three yellow totes to the auto zone for 8 points, stack the yellow totes in the auto zone for an additional 12 points, and start preparing for the teleop period. During the teleop period, teams can stack grey totes on the scoring platforms for 2 points each, stack recycle bins on each tote stack for 4 points per tote in the stack, put litter in the scored recycle bins for 6 points per container, push litter into the landfill zone for 1 point each, move four yellow totes onto the Step for 20 points per alliance, or stack four yellow totes onto the Step for 40 points per alliance. Since each alliance is only supplied with three yellow totes, the alliances are required to cooperate in order to get these large point bonuses.

Read about our 2015 robot, Jimmy John, here.

 

2014: Aerial Assist

Aerial Assist is the 2014 FRC game, played with 6 teams divided into two ‘alliances’ of three teams each. The game is played on a 24’8” by 54’ field. The game is divided into two sections; a 10 second autonomous period (auton), where robots control themselves, and a 2 minute 20 second teleoperated period (teleop), where human players control the robot. There are 4 goals located on either side of the field. There are two high and two low goals. The field is symmetrical with a ‘truss’ or high bar separating it. Scoring in the high goal will earn 10 points for the team, while scoring in the low goal will only earn 1. Robots can add points to scored balls by passing them to a different robot on the same alliance. This is referred to as an ‘assist’. Teams can get up to 3 assists by passing the ball to every robot on their team. Teams can also earn extra points by throwing the ball over the truss, catching a ball thrown over the truss, scoring in auton, and/or moving into their teams section of the field during auton.

Read about our 2014 robot, Rohrbot, here.

 

2013: Ultimate Ascent

Ultimate Ascent is the 2013 FRC game, played on a 27′ x 54′ field. It is played by two alliance of 3 teams each. The game is played with white and colored frisbees. The game has 5 goals that a robot can launch the frisbees into to score. 4 goals are located on the opposing alliances wall. One is worth 3 points per frisbee, two are worth 2 points, and one is worth one. There are two pyramids located in the field that have goals on the tops of them. A robot can score colored frisbees in these goals for 5 points apiece. The game starts with a 15 second autonomous period where robots act without any human interaction, after that the drivers take control for the rest of the game. At the end of the game robots can climb the pyramids. If a robot reaches the first level it earns 10 points, second 20, or third 30. The level of the robot is determined by its lowest point At the end of the game the human players can attempt to throw the colored discs to earn points.

Read about our 2013 robot, Discobolus, here.

 


2012: Rebound Rumble

Rebound Rumble is the 2012 FRC game played on a 27′ by 54′ court. Two alliances of three teams each operate their robots to shoot basketballs into one of the four hoops on the opposite side of the field. The hoops are arranged in a diamond configuration. The top hoop is worth three points; the middle two hoops are worth two points; the bottom hoop is worth one point. The game begins with a fifteen second Hybrid period in which human players have the option of controlling the robot using the Kinect Station. All balls scored during the hybrid period are given a three point bonus. Tele-op period lasts for two minutes following Hybrid period in which human drivers control the robot. Near the end of the match, robots may attempt to balance robots onto the bridges of their respective alliance colors. Bonus qualification points are given to teams who balance the middle Coopertition bridge with an opposing alliance robot.

Read about our 2012 robot, Elset, here.

 


2011: Logo Motion

Logo Motion is the 20th FRC game, played in 2011 on a 27′ by 54′ field. Two alliances of three teams each operate their robots to hang tubes on the scoring pegs on the close side of the field. Two arrays of 3 by 3 pegs lie in each side of the field. Tubes hung on the top rack are worth three points each; middle row hung tubes are worth two points, and bottom row hung tubes are worth one point. During Autonomous period, teams hang ubertubes, which double the value of the tube on the rack. Tele-op period lasts for two minutes following Autonomous period. Any “Logo” of a Triangle-Circle-Square that is hung on one array will double the score for that array’s row. Ten seconds before the end of the match, robots can deploy Minibots onto one of the two designated towers for their alliance. Minibots race to the top of the pole with first place earning a thirty point bonus, second place earning a twenty point bonus, third place earning a fifteen point bonus, four place earning a ten point bonus.

Read about our 2011 robot, Cuddles, here.

 


2010: Breakaway

Breakaway is the 2010 FRC game played on a 27′ by 54′ field. Two alliances of three teams each operate their robots to score balls on the close side of the field. Two goals exist on either side of the alliance wall for each alliance. A fifteen second Autonomous period begins the game where robots score soccer balls into their goal. A two minute Tele-op period follows the autonomous period where robots continue to score balls into their goal. Near the end of the match, robots may deploy hanging mechanism to grasp onto their respective towers for a two point bonus. For any robot that manages to suspend themselves off another alliance member robot, another three point bonus is given.

Read about our 2010 robot, Seizure, here.