2012 – Elset

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Name

Elset

Our lead mentor, Quentin, suggested the name Elset as our team went into a voting session for the robot’s name. Elset is the username that Tim, the LabView programming mentor, had used for many things. Tim had done a huge amount of work in the 2011 season, teaching and mentoring the only student programmer on the team. After moving to Colorado at the beginning of the 2012 season, he still kept in touch with the team, helping out by reviewing programming and commenting on our progress. It was only right to honor this unseen hero in the 2012 season.

Status

Out of Service

Season Record

  • Kettering:
    • Rank 4
    • Record 14 – 5 – 1
    • Finalist
  • Livonia:
    • Rank 1
    • Record 16 – 4 – 0
    • Regional winner
  • States:
    • Rank 18
    • Record 7 – 7 – 0
    • Quarter-Finalist
  • Galileo (Worlds):
    • Rank 21
    • Record 9 – 3 – 0
    • Quarter-Finalist


Specifications:

Drive Train
  • (4) CIM motors
  • (2) Super shifters
  • (4) 6″ High traction wheels
  • (2) 6″ Pneumatically actuated omni-wheels
Elevator
  • (1) BaneBot RS-775-18V
  • Motor goes through a 16:1 gearbox and is attached to one roller
  • (7) 10″ O-rings stretched over two rollers
Hopper
  • (1) Two-wire 393 VEX motor
  • Motor un-jams balls in case two balls enter the elevator at once
Shooter
  • (1) Window motor
  • Motor is coupled directly to a foam feeder wheel
  • (2) BaneBot RS-550-12V
    • BaneBots are coupled to a CIM-U-LATOR Gearbox
  • (2) Rubber treaded 2010 8″ FIRSTWheels
Bridge Tipper
  • (2) 6″ pistons
  • Actuates and rests at 51°
  • Uses mechanical advantage to displace the force of the bridge into the horizontal plane
  • Lined with “Self Lubricating Plastic” to prevent robot and field damage
“Solenoid π” (Pi)
  • (1) 14″ Piston
  • Actuates when the robot is off the edge of the bridge
  • Lowers the swing force of the bridge by displacing it into the piston
Miscellaneous Facts
  • 2012 was the first year that Team 3322 used pneumatics
  • Our first actuating drive train
  • Shooter compntents were water-jetted by Team 67, the HOT Team
  • “Solenoid 3” is actually solenoid valves 5 and 6 in programming; “Solenoid 3” was the code-name for the project
  • Our first robot to use PID in order to control the speed of the shooter wheel
  • No vision targeting (contrary to the placement of the camera)
  • The use of netting returns to Team 3322’s robot; our rookie year robot used netting as well (2010)
  • Can go over the bump, even though the robot was not designed to do so